On September 27, 2017, the Fifth Circuit in U.S.A. v. Don Moss, Curtis Dantin, Grand Isle Shipyard, Incorporated, and Christopher Srubar, No. 16-30516 (5th Cir. September 27, 2017), issued a decision affirming the District Court’s dismissal of criminal charges against a number of oil field contractors resulting from a welding accident that occurred

ALI-MLALast week, 425 admiralty and maritime lawyers, law professors, U.S. Coast Guard officers, law students, and maritime industry professionals descended on New Orleans for the Golden Rules: Tulane Admiralty Law Institute and Maritime Law Association’s 50-Year Reunion. The event kicked off Wednesday morning at the New Orleans Board of Trade. The morning CLE program

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The 25th Biennial Admiralty Law Institute kicked off with great success on March 11, 2015. Informative presentations continued on March 12-13, building on the theme of this year’s conference, “Symposium on Maritime Personal Injury and Death: Jurisdiction to Judgment.”

Thursday, March 12th: The second day of the Admiralty Law Institute began with a panel discussion

Pre-Judgment Interest RateThe current post-judgment interest rate in federal court is the infinitesimally meager rate of 0.22% (that is 22 hundredths of a percent, not 22 percent) as per statute, 28 U.S.C. § 1961(a). In contrast, the rate of pre-judgment interest is within the discretion of the district court (and therefore rarely disturbed on appeal), and furthermore

Horton v Maersk Line DecisionIn John Horton v. Maersk Line, Limited, Case No. 14-14450 (11 Cir., 02/27/2015) the 11th Circuit issued an unpublished decision finding that the International Safety Management Code (the “Code”) did not create vessel duties to a longshoreman over and above that established in Scindia.

The plaintiff, John Horton, a longshoreman, was working

The U. S. Fifth Circuit recently held that an injured seaman was precluded from recovering maintenance and cure where he intentionally provided false information during a pre-employment physical conducted by a previous employer that was later acquired by his current employer. Although the current employer did not conduct its own pre-employment physical, the Fifth Circuit