Photo of Robert J. Stefani

Bob Stefani practices in the areas of marine finance and other financial, corporate transactions and maritime and commercial litigation and government regulation.

Due to their increasing size, specialization and technological sophistication, today’s vessels present attractive “big-ticket” financing opportunities. However, commercial vessels, regardless of type, will inevitably incur maritime liens, which are priority claims that arise by operation of law, and are enforceable against the vessel in rem. Lenders therefore must be cognizant of, and account for, the special attributes of maritime liens in evaluating and documenting these types of transactions, whether structured as loans or leases.

This article discusses the characteristics of maritime liens, the priority of these liens in relation to the desired first-priority secured position of a lender or lessor, and prudent practices for assessing and mitigating the risks posed by such liens. The focus of this article is on transactions involving commercial (as opposed to recreational or fishing) vessels documented under the laws of the United States. 
Continue Reading

OSV OutlookI attended an excellent conference on March 3, 2016, put on by WorkBoat® exploring the “OSV Capital Outlook for 2016 and Beyond”. The conference featured a diverse and highly experienced panel of speakers including investment and marketing analysts and consultants, vessel operators, shipyard executives and WorkBoat® editors. You may want to read WorkBoat’s®

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards’ proposal for short term fixes for the State’s fiscal problems includes a shot at already-hurting offshore supply vessel owners/operators. OSV operators/owners currently receive a refundable credit of 100% of the ad valorem taxes paid on vessels operating on the Outer Continental Shelf. The Governor’s plan would suspend these credits for

Vessel Purchase Agreements
Vessel sales are a constant in the marine industry, even during downturns in the market. In fact, some see adverse market conditions as an opportunity to find bargains on vessels and other marine equipment. Once the buyer has “kicked the tires” on a vessel and the parties have agreed on a price, there usually is

I think this Workboat article outlined succinctly the challenges faced by debt-laden shipowners in the current market downturn. With adverse market conditions expected to continue for the long term in almost all shipping sectors, shipowners should be taking the following measures to keep their heads above water:
  • evaluate debt service obligations and ability to pay;

Business attorney Henry King (left) and intellectual property attorney Len Brignac (right) at Gallier Hall moments after engineer Tyler Ortego (center) of ORA Estuaries won the 2014 Water Challenge.

On March 24, four local entrepreneurs competed in New Orleans’ 2014 Water Challenge, sponsored by King Krebs & Jurgens in partnership with

With increasing frequency, parties to charters and other maritime contracts are including so-called Designated Entity Clauses or “OFAC” provisions. These clauses have the aim of complying with sanction programs such those administered by the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) or multi-national organizations such as the European Union or United Nations. But, do the