New Orleans Maritime Law
The Admiralty Law Institute runs from March 11-13 in New Orleans.

March 11, 2015, marked the first day of the 25th Biennial Admiralty Law Institute. Held at Tulane University in New Orleans, the ALI is the oldest and largest continuing legal education program devoted entirely to maritime law. The theme of this year’s conference is “Symposium on Maritime Personal Injury and Death: Jurisdiction to Judgment,” and Wednesday’s presentations were certainly in keeping with that theme. Some highlights from ALI’s first day:

First up was a panel discussion of recent developments in the ancient law of maintenance and cure. The panel noted that, despite the many modern improvements to the seaman’s lot, such as union contracts, vacation allowances, and disability pensions, the entitlement to maintenance and cure remains diligently guarded by the courts. The panel also discussed developments in the case law, such as the inability of the employer to turn a blind eye to accessible evidence corroborating the maintenance and cure claim, the scope of the seaman’s duty to disclose a pre-existing condition, and latent illnesses of the seaman–a subject that pushes the limits of the course and scope analysis.

Another topic up for discussion was cruise ships. The discussion was divided into two parts. First, regulation and compliance, followed by passenger and crew claims. A major topic of discussion was recent developments in the 11th Circuit regarding ship’s physicians. In the 5th Circuit the law remains that a ship’s physician, like a concessionaire, is not an employee or agent of the ship and thus no right of action exists against the shipowner for the medical malpractice or negligence of the on-board physician. As has been stated more often than once, ships are not floating hospitals. However, obtaining personal jurisdiction over the ship’s doctor in such cases is nearly impossible, so aggrieved parties are often left with no avenue of recovery. It seems the law is changing in the 11th Circuit, with a recent case holding the shipowner liable on an apparent agency theory.

Wednesday’s other presentations addressed attorney-client privilege and the admiralty practitioner, vessel status and jurisdiction (which included a very interesting discussion of the Lozman case) and removal of maritime cases. All presentations were followed by lively, and occasionally heated, questions and comments from the attendees. The day was capped off with a very well-attended cocktail reception at the lovely New Orleans Board of Trade.

Thursday’s topics include punitive damages, arbitration and mediation of maritime disputes, and litigating maritime disasters.