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Offshore Winds A Legal Barometer for Marine and Energy Business

BOEM Finding Advances Development of Mid-Atlantic Offshore Wind Farm; But Tailwinds are Behind Faster Moving Gulf Coast Projects in State Waters

Posted in Energy, Offshore Wind

Middelgrunden Wind Plant (HC Sorensen, Middelgrunden Wind Turbine Cooperative, NREL/Pix 17855

On May 14, 2012, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) announced a finding of “no competitive interest” with regard to a proposed right-of-way grant area off the Mid-Atlantic coast for construction of an offshore wind energy transmission line. While BOEM’s decision represents a key step forward for this federal offshore wind farming project, two fast-moving projects off the coast of Texas suggest that development in waters under state jurisdiction may well have the inside track over federal projects, due to a more streamlined regulatory process. In addition, offshore wind projects along the Gulf Coast benefit from a general population more welcoming to offshore industry, as well as a high concentration of marine and offshore industrial fabricators and service companies that give the Gulf Coast a competitive advantage with lower construction, operation, transportation and maintenance costs.

The Coastal Point Energy project has been licensed for testing by the Texas General Land Office and contemplates installation (planned for the end of 2011 but apparently delayed) of a test wind turbine on a platform in shallow Texas waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Ultimately, Coastal Point plans to spend $720,000,000 on a 300 megawatt wind farm 8.5 miles off Galveston on 12,350 leased acres.  Additionally, the Army Corps of Engineers is developing an environmental impact statement, anticipated to be completed in 2014, for a second project under development by Baryonyx Corporation, Inc.  Baryonyx holds leases in Gulf of Mexico state waters, offshore Willacy and Cameron Counties, and proposes to construct an approximately 300-turbine wind farm.

As the Gulf Coast offshore wind industry continues to develop, it brings with it supply chain manufacturing and related job growth.  An example of the potential for such economic development is the manufacturing facility established by UK-based Blade Dynamics at the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans East.  Incentivized by state tax credits and worldwide demand for wind turbine parts, the company is hiring hundreds of workers. This type of green energy industrial development bodes well for the economic future of a region whose prospects were severely compromised by the Obama Administration’s drilling post-BP spill drilling moratorium and general hostility to the oil and gas industry that traditionally has been the backbone of the area economy.